Monday, February 21, 2011

Fruit Of The Winter


Friends of mine from outside of Egypt usually look at these things and simply wonder what on earth they are. The English name for them is Cape Gooseberry, although I don't believe that they are actually related to gooseberries at all. Locally they are called "harankash". They remind me of the tomatillo that is used to make chile verde in Mexico, sort of a small green tomato that has a similar covering. They have a sweet tart taste and are very refreshing. With the police still not really in evidence in the streets, the vendors have been busy.

7 comments:

brattcat said...

I look forward to these posts from you. This one, like the news I'm hearing, suggests commerce is returning to the streets.

Hawaga said...

I remember when many years ago I bought this fruit in my home country.I had no idea what was that and it costed triple price of normal fruit.Then when I moved to Egypt I tried it only once.

Anonymous said...

It is also called "el set el mestakhabeya" (the hidden woman)

Sheryl said...

They're not common in Canada. They were used as dessert garnish by a friend of mine working in a kitchen in Ireland. Since I didn't know what he was talking about, he sent me a box in the mail. He called them "physalis" but more commonly they are called Chinese gooseberries, I believe.

Maryanne Stroud Gabbani said...

Thank you, Anonymous. Years ago my husband told me this name and I'd forgotten it. It's a very evocative.

Anonymous said...

Just wanted to say that since I found your blog, I enjoy the pictures and posts. Thank you for sharing

luv2quilt2 said...

I also look forward to your posts. I 'found' and started following you when we were planning a trip to Egypt a year ago. Before the trip, it was to help me learn about the country, and afterward it was to help me remember what had to have been one of the best trips of my life. Thank you for your wonderful peeks at everyday life.